Tag Archives: cambodia

Let’s take a minute…

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Let’s take a minute…

Riverkids NGO charity deserves a minute of your time. Maybe even 3 and a half minutes.

Which is why I’ve decided to shorten the video I made for them from 5 minutes to 3 and a half for those of you on a time budget. All I ask is that you use the extra minute and a half finding out how to volunteer, how to donate, or simply learning about their plight here: http://www.riverkidsproject.org/ Read the rest of this entry

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South East Asia in a nutshell…

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South East Asia in a nutshell…

Hey, what was that? You want to watch a short video briefly outlining what me and Gemma got up to in South East Asia?

Well look no further!  Read the rest of this entry

My top ten places to visit in South East Asia

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My top ten places to visit in South East Asia

Me and Tim made a backup plan when we missed our flight out of Hanoi. We decided to hire motorbikes and travel the length of Vietnam. And whilst we don’t have time to take that trip now (thanks to the lovely people in the Quatar office) I do have time to reflect on South East Asia.

Here are my highlights of South East Asia:  Read the rest of this entry

3 courses… Eating spiders and ants

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3 courses… Eating spiders and ants

South East Asia is a Mecca for new and exciting foods. Between us we’ve eaten grasshoppers, mini oyster omelettes, raw crab, morning glory, rambutan, tarantula and ants. I videod most of it too! But then I accidentally deleted it.

However I did manage to save the footage of us eating tarantulas and ants… Gemma’s scared of spiders and that’s what makes this video one of my favourites! Read the rest of this entry

The topsy turvy of South East Asia

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The topsy turvy of South East Asia

South East Asia is well known for being, shall we say, ‘higgledy piggledy’. Cambodia’s a country where logic means nothing, Thailand’s known for its crazy nights and Vietnam for its ‘adventurous’ cuisine. The continent is full of disoriented travellers trying to make head and tail of this new ‘sense’. And I’m sure it is sensical. Just not to us. Here are some of the things we’ve seen during our South East Asia trip that haven’t made it onto the blog yet: Read the rest of this entry

Riverkids Project: The return to volunteering

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Riverkids Project: The return to volunteering

Over the last few years, since I first volunteered at Riverkids, I have been helping them from the UK. I schedule tweets based on news articles, edit reports and write blogs based on their work. As part of that I’ve learn a lot about voluntourism and why it’s not always all it’s cracked up to be.

One of the main problems with voluntourism is that it’s hard to actually help change a community in just a few short weeks. It can be disruptive to the community and the individuals you work with. Instead of helping, you can contribute to keeping the people dependent on aid. Without proper help, you can cause far more damage than good. Read the rest of this entry

Revisiting the Killing Fields

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Revisiting the Killing Fields

There is nothing more potent than context. It fills in all the clouds with stark imagery. It can be brutal, upsetting and give you nightmares for life. But not the killing fields. Despite everything, there is a strange sense of calm at Choeung Ek. A sense that now this is a place of rest for the millions who were killed there by the Khmer Rouge just 30 years ago. Read the rest of this entry

In dire need of a holiday…

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In dire need of a holiday…

Ah the once in a lifetime opportunity to volunteer abroad, teaching English to disadvantaged children and learning about their lives first hand. The joy of feeling that in some small way you’re helping them. We were thrilled to be working with local Phnom Penh NGO Riverkids and had been enjoying every second of it…

But we’re British. And a long weekend was coming up.

Despite the fact that we’d both quit our day jobs 3 months earlier and had been happily travelling the world since, we’d decided that after a week of genuinely enjoyable voluntary work, we were in dire need of a holiday. It’s amazing how quickly you can fall back into old habits. Read the rest of this entry

Phnom Penh – A city in unity

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Phnom Penh – A city in unity

Phnom Penh is dusty, polluted and over-populated. According to the locals it’s politically corrupt and oppressive. We’d been told by other travellers not to stay there for more than a few days but we stayed for over two weeks and found the city both charming and confusing. There’s hope for Phnom Penh and we don’t want to leave it now.

Looking around as I stepped off the bus I could see why other travellers might want to leave. Compared to the rest of Cambodia it lacks natural beauty and asthetically it’s plain. I turned around to make a dissaproving face at Gemma but she was smiling, she’s been before and for some reason, she loves it.  Read the rest of this entry

Return to Phnom Penh

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Return to Phnom Penh

Nobody likes change. It throws you right off wack. Like with mars bars and snickers – once they were snack size and now they’re no more than a measly mouthful but they cost more?! Then again, nobody could finish a whole Mars bar back in the day.

When I first came to Phnom Penh four years ago it was a huge polluted, dusty city. There were a lot of expats living there and a bustling traveller scene so there were some westernised restaurants and bars, but there were no big shops, just one supermarket and one big book/stationary shop. Read the rest of this entry